Marine Institute

Explore Ireland’s Coastal Communities in Oceans of Learning series

The Cliffs of Moher are amongst the most impressive coastlines in the world, and one of Ireland's top tourist attractions, drawing almost one million visitors every year.

16 June 2020 - In Ireland, 1.9 million people live within 5km of the coast and many communities along the Irish coast depend on industries such as tourism, fishing and aquaculture. Furthermore, there is now mounting evidence that the ocean plays a key role in the general wellbeing of our coastal communities. This week’s Oceans of Learning series will explore the importance of Ireland’s Coastal Communities, with resources from the Marine Institute, Commissioners of Irish Lights, Údarás na Gaeltachta, Galway City Museum and the Explorers Education Programme. Over 10 weeks, the Marine Institute and partners are celebrating our world’s shared ocean and our connection to the sea in our Oceans of Learning series, sharing news and offering online interactive activities, videos and downloadable resources on a new marine topic each week.

Dr Paul Connolly, CEO of the Marine Institute said, “As an island nation, our 7,711 kilometres of coastline is one of our greatest assets. Our fishing and aquaculture industries, tourism and marine leisure make a significant contribution to the economic development of Ireland’s coastal regions, and provide employment opportunities for many in our coastal communities. At the Marine Institute, we support Ireland’s coastal communities and economies, through our research, ocean knowledge, infrastructure and advisory services.”

One of the key industries contributing to Ireland’s ocean and coastal economies is tourism and leisure. The sector generated a turnover of €1.25 billion in 2018, and provided employment for over 18,000 people - accounting for 57% of all employment in the Irish economy. Ireland’s scenic coastline, rocky escarpments and beaches attract a large number of overseas visitors every year. In 2018, 76% of overseas tourists visited a coastal area and 61% participated in a marine-related leisure activity. Coastal sightseeing, beach and island visits and walking, running and cycling along the coast are popular activities for overseas visitors.

The Irish coastline is dotted with inlets, piers and harbours used by fishermen every day. Fisheries in Ireland significantly contribute to the economy as a whole and in particular t to coastal communities. In 2019, Ireland had over 2,000 registered commercial fishing vessels and the industry provided employment for 3,000 people. Inshore fishing take places in many rural communities with fishermen using small vessels to catch species such as lobsters, crabs, oysters, scallop, razor fish and clams. Inshore fish stocks (up to 10 miles from the Irish coast) are managed nationally and the Marine Institute works closely with Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM) on inshore fisheries management.

The seafood industry is also an integral part of Ireland’s rural coastal communities. In 2019, more than 16,000 people were employed directly and indirectly in the seafood industry, with high levels of employment in Ireland’s coastal regions in Donegal, Cork, Galway and Clare. Oysters, salmon and mussels are sustainably farmed around the coast of Ireland. The aquaculture industry in Ireland produces about 37,000 tonnes annually, and the turnover generated by marine aquaculture in 2018 was estimated at €176 million. Shellfish aquaculture activities are widely distributed across the coast of Ireland, while finfish aquaculture occurs mainly in the west of Ireland. Seaweed harvesting is a traditional activity in Ireland that also generates income and offers employment in coastal areas. Seaweed harvesting takes place around the coast of Ireland, particularly in counties Galway, Donegal, Sligo, Kerry and Cork.

Climate change impacts pose significant challenges to coastal communities. Such impacts include rising sea levels, coastal erosion, flooding, and an increase in extreme weather events. Adapting to a changing climate is one of the greatest challenges facing society, governments and decision-makers worldwide. The Marine Institute works with national and international partners to observe and understand how our ocean is changing and to determine how to respond to current and future patterns of change that impact Ireland’s economy and people. Through the BlueFish Project, a unique project linking art and science, the Marine Institute has also worked with coastal communities in Ireland and Wales on the importance of the ocean to their livelihoods and the impacts of a changing climate.

“As a small island nation, the health of our oceans and the wellbeing of our coastal communities have always been and will continue to be inextricably linked” said Dr Connolly

The Marine Institute’s Oceans of Learning series this week highlights Ireland’s Coastal Communities. Oceans of Learning offers videos, interactive activities and downloadable resources on our coasts and seashore. Commissioners of Irish Lights offers videos on the work they do to ensure safe navigation around our coast and a colouring book on the Great Lighthouses of Ireland. Find out more about Údarás na Gaeltachta and marine businesses in coastal communities through a series of videos. Discover the animals, seaweeds, plants and creatures along the seashore with the Explorers Education Programme’s Seashore Guide Work Book, and explore the habitats of Galway Bay with activities from Galway City Museum. There are also videos on the Marine Institute's shellfish safety programme and our coastal economy, posters and colouring activities about the marine life found along Ireland's coast. To access the resources visit Ireland's Coastal Communities.

For more information on Oceans of Learning, visit www.marine.ie and follow the Marine Institute on FacebookInstagram and Twitter.

ENDS

Media Opportunity: Media interviews are available with Marine Institute CEO, Dr Paul Connolly.

For further information, please contact:

Sheila Byrnes e. sheila [dot] byrnes [at] marine [dot] ie m. +353 (0)87 225 0871
Sinéad Coyne e. sinead [dot] coyne [at] marine [dot] ie m. +353 (0)87 947 7090

EDITOR’S NOTES

SEMRU Reports
NUI Galway's Socio-Economic Marine Research Unit (SEMRU) published 'Ireland’s Ocean Economy’ in June 2019 and 'A Survey of Marine and Coastal Overseas Tourism Activity in Ireland' in September 2019. This research was carried out with the support of the Marine Institute and it is funded by the Marine Research Sub-Programme PBA/SE/16/01 ‘Valuing and understanding the dynamics of Ireland’s Ocean Economy.’ Full reports can be accessed from the SEMRU website at www.nuigalway.ie/semru


BlueFish Project

The BlueFish Project is an Ireland Wales Territorial Co-operation Operation for the Irish and Celtic Sea, focusing on cross border collaboration, climate change and community engagement. Led by Bangor University, the project brings together Aberystwyth and Swansea Universities in Wales, the Marine Institute, Bord Iascaigh Mhara and University College Cork in Ireland. BlueFish will develop knowledge and understanding of the marine resources of the Irish Sea and Celtic Seas by addressing knowledge gaps regarding the effects on and potential vulnerability of selected commercial fish and shellfish from predicted climate change and the impacts on coastal communities. www.bluefishproject.com